Question: What Is An Example Of Epiphora?

What are the examples of parallelism?

ExamplesLacking parallelismParallel”She likes cooking, jogging, and to read.””She likes cooking, jogging, and reading.” “She likes to cook, jog, and read.””He likes baseball and running.””He likes playing baseball and running.” “He likes to play baseball and to run.”1 more row.

What is anaphora with example?

Anaphora is a figure of speech in which words repeat at the beginning of successive clauses, phrases, or sentences. … For example, Martin Luther King’s famous “I Have a Dream” speech contains anaphora: “So let freedom ring from the prodigious hilltops of New Hampshire.

What is an example of Anadiplosis?

Anadiplosis is a figure of speech in which a word or group of words located at the end of one clause or sentence is repeated at or near the beginning of the following clause or sentence. This line from the novelist Henry James is an example of anadiplosis: “Our doubt is our passion, and our passion is our task.”

What is an anaphora in English?

1 : repetition of a word or expression at the beginning of successive phrases, clauses, sentences, or verses especially for rhetorical or poetic effect Lincoln’s “we cannot dedicate—we cannot consecrate—we cannot hallow—this ground” is an example of anaphora — compare epistrophe.

What is an example of Hypophora?

Hypophora is where you raise a question and then answer it. Therefore, those two sentences are an example of hypophora. A question was raised and immediately answered. … A question was raised, then it was immediately answered.

What does Anthimeria mean?

In rhetoric, anthimeria or antimeria (from Greek: ἀντί, antí, ‘against, opposite’, and μέρος, méros, ‘part’), means using one part of speech as another, such as using a noun as a verb: “The little old lady turtled along the road.” In linguistics, this is called conversion; when a noun becomes a verb, it is a denominal …

What are some examples of hyperboles?

Examples of Hyperbole in Everyday SpeechHe’s running faster than the wind.This bag weighs a ton.That man is as tall as a house.This is the worst day of my life.The shopping cost me a million dollars.My dad will kill me when he comes home.Your skin is softer than silk.She’s as skinny as a toothpick.More items…•

Is repetition and anaphora the same?

anaphora is repetition of words at the beginning of clauses, while repetition can occur anywhere, and is a more general term that includes anaphora.

What is an example of Epistrophe?

When a word is repeated at the end of a clause or sentence, it brings attention to the word as important in the text. Examples of Epistrophe: May God bless you. May God keep you.

What is the difference between anaphora and Epiphora?

An anaphora is repetition of the first part of successive sentences, whereas in an epiphora repetition occurs in the last part of successive clauses and sentences. … Despite being different in their structures, both anaphora and epiphora have the same function of laying emphasis on a particular point.

What is an example of irony?

Verbal irony is when someone says something, but means the opposite. Ex. When you get an “F” on your term paper and say, “Wow, I did a really good job on my term paper!” That is verbal irony.

What is a Conduplicatio?

Rhetorical Figures in Sound: Conduplicatio. Conduplicatio (con-do-plih-CAE-sheeoh): Figure of repetition in which the key word or words in one phrase, clause, or sentence is/are repeated at or near the beginning of successive sentences, clauses, or phrases; repetition of a key word over successive phrases or clauses.

What is the opposite of anaphora?

Epistrophe is a figure of speech in which one or more words repeat at the end of successive phrases, clauses, or sentences. … The opposite of epistrophe is anaphora, which involves the repetition of words at the beginning of successive phrases, clauses, or sentences.

What is example of assonance?

Assonance is a repetition of vowel sounds, whereas rhyme is a repetition of both vowel and consonant sounds. Here are a few examples: Assonance: Oh, how the evening light fades over the lake. Fade and lake share a vowel sound, but not a consonant sound, so this line uses assonance rather than rhyme.

What does Epiphora mean?

Epiphora is an overflow of tears onto the face, other than caused by normal crying. It is a clinical sign or condition that constitutes insufficient tear film drainage from the eyes, in that tears will drain down the face rather than through the nasolacrimal system.

Why is Epiphora used?

Through repetition, epiphora provides emphasis of key words and phrases. With repetition falling at the end of clauses or sentences, epiphora draws words and ideas together to create a focal point of sound and meaning.

What are 5 examples of assonance?

Here are a few short assonance examples:”Hear the mellow wedding bells” by Edgar Allen Poe.”Try to light the fire””I lie down by the side fo my bride”/”Fleet feet sweep by sleeping geese”/”Hear the lark and harken to the barking of the dark fox gone to ground” by Pink Floyd.”It’s hot and it’s monotonous.” by Sondheim.More items…

What is an Asyndeton example?

Asyndeton is a writing style where conjunctions are omitted in a series of words, phrases or clauses. … For example, Julius Caesar leaving out the word “and” between the sentences “I came. I saw. I conquered” asserts the strength of his victory.

What is Epiphora in figure of speech?

Epistrophe (Greek: ἐπιστροφή, “return”) is the repetition of the same word or words at the end of successive phrases, clauses or sentences. It is also known as epiphora and occasionally as antistrophe. It is a figure of speech and the counterpart of anaphora.

What is Epiplexis?

In rhetoric, epiplexis is an interrogative figure of speech in which questions are asked in order to rebuke or reproach rather than to elicit answers. Adjective: epiplectic. Also known as epitimesis and percontatio.

What is an example of chiasmus?

Chiasmus is a figure of speech in which the grammar of one phrase is inverted in the following phrase, such that two key concepts from the original phrase reappear in the second phrase in inverted order. The sentence “She has all my love; my heart belongs to her,” is an example of chiasmus.